This Could Be You

Part One: Yes, I am talking to YOU

Do you consider yourself a good nurse, or put another way, would you want your family taken care of by someone just like you? Do you feel comfortable teaching new nurses “how we do it” at your hospital, or on your infusion team, or in your home health care agency or nursing home? I am willing to bet that you can recognize deviations in care, and recognize good care when you see it, and yet, let’s be honest. 99.9% of “us” nurses get the willies when we think about testifying in court. A part of this fear is the belief that we might find ourselves being deposed or on the witness stand, defending our own actions. Talk about a knuckle-biter.

Well, take a step back from that ever-present awareness that you could err, and think about the nurse who already accused of making a mistake and causing harm to a patient. Doesn’t she need help?

Who is that nurse? Not necessarily someone in PACU or CCU, but the nurse on the floor – the one giving or supervising tube feedings, suctioning an ET tube, helping a patient to the bathroom or pushing meds in an IV. Does that sound like anyone you know? In this world of computerized documentation, meant to make our job straightforward (or someone’s job, at any rate), you know how easy it is to miss a check box even though work was done – your Risk Management department delivers this message like your job depends upon it. Oh.

If you were the nurse whose care was being questioned, who would you want on your side? Who else, but another nurse who works in the same environment you do, who understands the rapid pace and demands upon your time, the responsibility for supervising the actions of others and the potential consequences of being nothing more than “there” at the time an event occurred.

Your nursing experience is what makes you so valuable to the legal system and fellow nurses, because you do not live in a world of textbooks and online research.

If  asked to review the medical records of the patient harmed in the hospital or any other setting, would you know how to do that? Of course you would; you know what belongs in a chart and therefore you know what is missing when you (don’t) see it.  Chances are quite high that if someone asks you to serve as an expert witness, harm did occur, because attorneys are not in the business of spending upwards of 100k to try a case that has no injury. Injury and merit, however, are not synonymous.

The question you would be asked is not “did a bad outcome occur”, but “did the bad outcome arise as a direct result of this nurse’s (in) action”? Can the nurse’s care be rightfully defended, who else was in the chain of command, and most importantly, was the standard of care met? Remember that nurse experts are not being asked to diagnose a condition; they are being asked what a reasonable and prudent nurse in the same setting would have done.

Next time, Part Two: When the shoe is on the other appendage.

Please visit my LNC Corner on http://www.NursesNetwork.com

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